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  • Shawn Myszka 9:36 pm on September 19, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    2017 Play of the Week – Week 2 

    Game: Eagles at Chiefs

    Play: Kelce soars far & high above the Eagles

    Kelce pic 3

    What makes this the BTS Play of the Week?

    Like clockwork…another week passes in the NFL; and another list of exceptional movers show & shine their skills for us all to bear witness to on that Sunday. Sometimes, it just so happens that a player previously featured on our blog tries to make me look much smarter than I actually am by laying out the top display of movement skills for that respective week. This is precisely what we have this week.

    But as I alluded to above, there was more than enough competition for this week’s nod for the top movement performance. First, on the Monday night game, we saw a long, dazzling punt return by Detroit Lions defensive back, Jamal Agnew. Additionally, we had Washington Redskin RB, Chris Thompson juking and jiving his way around the Rams. Finally, in the same game, we also saw Todd Gurley, trying to beat the performer who was ultimately selected for the top spot at his own game by leaping over a Redskins defender.

    That all said, when all the votes were counted (i.e. my vote) it was our top Tight End mover of 2016 (see last year’s All-Movement Team here; https://footballbeyondthestats.wordpress.com/2017/01/10/2016-all-movement-team-offense/), Travis Kelce, who reigned supreme this week with his all-around athleticism showing his astonishing versatility taking a shovel pass from his QB and laying out in Superman-like fashion to clear numerous Philadelphia Eagles defenders.

    What happened movement-wise on the play?

    As I stated in last year’s write-up about him and me giving him his claim at the status as the top-moving Tight End in the game, I feel as though the thing that makes Travis Kelce so masterful is his movement dexterity & adaptability (the ability to adjust movement solutions to match the respective problem in front of him) combined with his variability & degeneracy (the ability to have a wide range of solutions to combine the way that they need to be) in his entire movement toolbox. For a dude who is 6’5” and 260lb, the extensiveness of Kelce’s toolbox is truly impressive. Though he usually displays it by moving in the open field during route running or after he gets a ball in his hands after a reception, we get to see the movement toolbox wide open on this play out of the backfield, as well. In fact, through the first two games of the season, there have been a number of times that Kelce has received the ball behind the line of scrimmage to find him moving really agile through tight spaces…so our play being featured today is really no fluke.

    On this play, with the game tied at 13, the Chiefs are marching with only 6:32 left in the game; they find themselves in a 2nd and 5 from the Eagles 15 yard line. With Kelce lined up to QB Alex Smith’s right playing in his usual hybrid TE/H-back role, with Chief’s burner and fellow All-Movement Team member Tyreek Hill going in motion for deceptive purposes to get eyes and bodies moving to the right side of the formation, and rookie RB Kareem Hunt already in the process of his second huge day running the football, the Eagles are caught in a web of Chief athleticism who are ready to try to takeover this game.

    With Smith’s toes on the 20 yard line, he fakes the hand-off to Hunt who takes off wide left. Unfortunately for the Chiefs, the Eagles DE didn’t bite on the Hunt fake nearly as much as most would so he ends up right in Smith’s lap. Luckily for Smith, his composure bails him out and he delivers a quick shovel pass to the quickly-cutting TE, Kelce, who once he receives the ball between the 16 and 17 yard lines, has a little room to not only perceive what’s happening in front of him (in respect to the movement problem that must be solved) but also to get up a slight accelerative head of steam to make the Eagle’s defenders a second guess as well as give Kelce himself the needed momentum for what is about to occur next.

    Kelce pic 4

    Being that the Eagles had 8 in the box in anticipation of a run, there is a Philly defender in the middle of the field who should have Kelce dead to rights before reaching the 1st down marker. However, this defender stumbles slightly off-balance in hesitation, and this issue coupled with Kelce’s supreme acceleration capabilities for this size allows him to have enough of a gap to use as a running lane between the hashes and the numbers; so much so that he easily picks up the first down at the 10 yard line and is very ready to get even more.

    As the big TE, passes by that first down line and through the trio of Eagle defenders, it’s easy to see he’s got really bad intentions for the oncoming safety that enters our picture 5-6 yards away from Kelce when they both realize that this 1v1 situation is likely only to end well for one of them! Like most defensive backs will do when they have this kind of target coming at them full-speed-ahead, the Eagle safety goes low (can we really blame him) knowing this is his only hope of bringing down a guy this big yet moving this fast.

    Recognizing that the safety is going low, Kelce maintains his speed to the point where we can tell he’s not going to have the body control to shut down the locomotion and go around him but instead must go over him! He times out his unilateral leap for the 5 yard line in an attempt to clear over the low positioned defender. While in the air, Kelce is met by two other Eagles players who’s last gasp at saving the Eagle defensive pride is to hit the flying TE hard enough to either jar the ball loose and/or make him regret taking off. However, much to Philly fans dismay, neither happens and Kelce ends up celebrating with his teammates in the end zone.

    Kelce pic 2

    Typically, with my own skill players, I typically advise them NOT to leave their feet in this manner as there are usually just too many negative repercussions that can occur when one does. However, I have also found that we should never attempt to restrict the intentions and instincts of a really dynamic playmaking mover when the patterns are naturally emerging in space and time as a response to the unique problem in front of them (rather than a pre-mediated hurdle/jump as we sometimes see occur). Thus, the sheer impressiveness of Kelce’s play here, and the novel movement solutions that emerged from his toolbox, was truly head-shaking.

    Click below to watch the star tight end doing his movement thing here:

    http://www.nfl.com/m/share?p=%2Fvideos%2Fnfl-cant-miss-plays%2F0ap3000000846432%2FCan-t-Miss-Play-Travis-Kelce-hurdles-defender-for-touchdown

     


     
  • Shawn Myszka 10:51 pm on September 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    2017 Play of the Week – Week 1 

    Game: Atlanta Falcons at Chicago Bears

    Play: Cohen makes good on his nickname

    Cohen pic 4

    What makes this the BTS Play of the Week?

    Here we are again! Oh sweet Movement Play of the Week breakdown & analysis, how I have missed you! It’s hard to believe that we are now on our fifth season of highlighting the play (sometimes plays) that I feel represents the league’s best for that week from a movement skill performance point of view.

    With every year that passes by, I am glad to say that this never gets old. Nothing excites me quite like watching elite athletes problem solving with their movement, under the sometimes unfathomably complex, pressure & anxiety-filled contextual demands that the NFL represents.

    On that note, one of the great things about the NFL is that on any given Sunday (or Thursday or Monday night), we can find literally dozens of plays where I feel as though extraordinary motor behavior lived & breathed. Note: This abundance of movement skill displayed exists in spite of the truth that I’ve stated here on this blog before…movement skill in the NFL could stand to get even better given the nature of the athletes within it and the lack of quality of the practice methods sometimes prescribed.

    But enough soapbox time for me! It’s time to recognize the real star of the show in Week 1 of the 2017 campaign and break down what allowed him to do what he did! Like any other week, this week’s recipient received stiff competition from the likes of Antonio Brown splitting the Browns defense & slashing through them in his normal, skillful way. I will say, AB84 doing what he did on that play (even though it is the Browns as the opponent), executing multiple precisely timed, sharp deceleration actions at high speeds is usually enough to get the nod.

    However, there was another movement performance that reigned in higher supreme, the execution of a rookie RB who I think we all will be seeing plenty of highlights of this season. No; it wasn’t Christian McCaffrey, Leonard Fournette, or Dalvin Cook. Shoot, if not one of them, then it had to be Kareem Hunt or Joe Mixon, right? Wrong again. The performance was that of a guy that most haven’t heard of but they know who he is now; Tarik Cohen of the Chicago Bears. I mean c’mon…the guy has the nickname “The Human Joystick” so how could I not love him?! Besides, showing out and solving problems on an NFL field in one’s very first regular season outing is impressive in and of itself! To do it facing the defending Conference Champions with a whole host of worthy movers on the other side; even more impressive!

    What happened movement-wise on the play?

    While you don’t get the nickname, “The Human Joystick” by not having supreme agility skills, you also don’t become an unknown if you are playing college football at a powerhouse. Hence the reason it’s likely that many out there have never heard of Tarik Cohen. The 5’6”, 181lb (how could I not love this guy?) back is out of North Carolina A&T where he played four record-breaking seasons. It was actually because of this that I first got to hear of Cohen when I got an opportunity to watch him do his thing in a game last season versus Kent State where he evaded the tackles of what felt like all 11 defenders multiple times on one single play (he ran for 250+ yards that day, I believe). After that game, I actually went and watched some of the highlights from the previous three seasons and I was very impressed.

    However, with watching how he achieved many of those performances (even with the bias of the fond appreciation of agile movers that I hold deep in my heart), I couldn’t help but question how much his skill set would transfer to the game at the next level, the NFL, this season. The game is just a tad faster after all (insert sarcasm). Well, even though he’s featured here this week from the first regular season game of his NFL career, it will still take a whole season to determine what gaps may exist in his movement toolbox (as teams begin to get more film on him, become familiar with how he moves, how he adapts under more complex/diverse problems in the NFL, etc) and how successful he can be over the long haul. It’s a story with a movement riddle that I, for one, will be following closely all season.

    But onto giving credit where credit is due…Tarik torched the Falcons and left their defenders with their heads turning and eyes buzzing…living up to his nickname. I could’ve picked a few plays from Sunday to illustrate but the one that I did pick came in the 2nd quarter, 3:55 to go, on 2nd & 7 from the Bears’ 28 yard line.

    Cohen is the lone deep back lined up 6 yards behind QB, Mike Glennon, who’s under center. Glennon takes the snap and tosses the ball wide to the strong side moving Cohen. The flow of the very athletically-stacked Falcon defense follows. The ball is pitched a tad high which actually probably is a blessing in that Cohen, though most definitely fixated on the primary task of first receiving the ball, gets an opportunity to allow his peripheral vision to briefly take in information regarding the pursuit of Falcons DE, #50, Brooks Reed, which will later be really useful information to be aware of.

    Cohen continues running nearly completely lateral to his left, only progressing vertically up the field by around one yard. This perspective keeps him 5 to 7 yards behind his offensive line at all times and in perceptual awareness on any potential holes & gaps in the defense that could have potentially opened up (i.e. to no avail). This distance is a likely an optimal one (a topic I have been exploring & investigating more of lately) which allows Cohen’s visual system a wide enough of a perspective to understand what potential opportunities for action exist (aka affordances for action). It’s also enough for him to know for certain, that due to the lack of a hole being where it was supposed to be, he must abandon ship on the tactical strategy and do what he (and other great movers) does best; adapt!

    Knowing that the last information that he likely gathered on Reed was that he was coming in hot behind him with a head of steam, Cohen decides to use this to his advantage. When he is approaching the numbers, still running at between the 21 and 22 yard line, he elects to come to a screeching halt and throws down the breaks into an angular deceleration stop which will create an efficient & effective technical opportunity to completely change direction.

    From this deceleration to cutting pattern, guys really have three options for reacceleration in the cut; 1). Transition into a few shuffle steps which will open up further movement options & directions. 2). Crossover off the left foot with the left leg traveling across the body (not a bad choice giving Cohen’s low COM). 3). Execute a rapid, power jab step with the right foot. Cohen elects to go with the 3rd option here. This is one which keeps his movement options open (which was the best feature and accomplishes the objective that hitting a few transition steps would have) just in case Reed wasn’t far enough to Cohen’s left in his pursuit.

    When he’s in middle of executing his power jab step (it’s in its pattern striking back & away from the flexed position and prior to touching the ground), you can see his visual gaze fixate on Reed and the other two Falcon defenders who have joined the pursuit party in the backfield. Though NFL players possess much more diverse movement toolboxes than those that Cohen faced at NC A&T, Cohen still believes he has them right where he wants them (and he’s right!). Reed’s momentum has him moving too quickly to completely control his own deceleration action and transition to close the distance enough to tackle Cohen or slow him down enough to allow his Linebacking buddies to do so. Honestly, Reed does a much better job here in this action than most defensive ends will (even the super athletically-gifted ones in the League); he forces Cohen to take several hockey-striding steps to get out of his outstretched arms which causes Cohen to actually lose ground at the immediate moment but gain ground when it comes to solving the movement problem!

    Cohen pic 3

    After Cohen fully bypasses Reed, he has enough kinesthetic sense & awareness to realize that the distance & spacing between he and the other Falcons defender in the backfield are not a match with their action capabilities so he moves to solving the next problem that lies in front of him (i.e. where his path should continue to and what lies ahead in the landscape). Cohen, still only on the 22 yard line but on the right hash now, is in full acceleration mode which, over short distances, is extraordinary based on the physical constraints he operates within (in a nutshell; powerful build on a shorter frame). Because of this, he covers the next 8 yards in a hurry all while processing the surrounding layout of his guys versus the Falcons defenders.

    At around the 25 yard line, all the way to the 29 yard line, Cohen utilizes the blocking efforts of his quarterback in the open field to give himself the option to go either direction (to the left of Glennon back into the teeth of the defense or to the right of Glennon to head towards the sideline) once the time calls for it. This time comes at the 30 yard line when an adequate gap has opened up AND when the Joystick has built up too much speed for the problem that has unfolded in front of him. The left crossover cut that changes his directional angle may look very subtle here and easy to control…but don’t let Cohen’s execution fool you! This cut, at the type of speeds that Cohen was already traveling, is NOT easy to control or handle the loading forces on…but of course, Cohen does so with great effectiveness; so much so that he loses very little speed and is able to stay in full acceleration mode to move through the created gap.

    Cohen pic 2

    As he passes Glennon (who has more than adequately fulfilled his blocking duties), the CB that the QB was blocking, Desmond Trufant, will now enter the problem and become another attempting tackler from behind Cohen who has a full head of linear speed steam now. In fact, Trufant, #21 (wait; they even allow a Falcon CB to wear Deion’s number?!) would be the one to ultimately bring him down after LB, Deion Jones, is able slow him down and knock him off his path ever so slightly but not bring him to the ground. This point where Trufant succeeds doesn’t come until Cohen is past the Falcon’s 30 yard line and has amassed 46 exciting yards.

    Of course, what we see throughout this play that makes it so damn special is true reactive agility. Sure; there are supremely crisp cutting patterns displayed (the angular power cut and the crossover cut) but it’s the perception-action coupling that makes this play extraordinary along with the functional adaptation that this young rookie (regardless of what his nickname is) stayed calm in control of its execution of.

    You can watch the Joystick doing his thing here:

    http://www.nfl.com/m/share?p=%2Fvideos%2Fnfl-cant-miss-plays%2F0ap3000000841590%2FCan-t-Miss-Play-Tarik-Cohen-finds-open-field-and-rushes-for-46-yards

     


     
  • glennpendlay 11:11 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Breaking PR’s. 

    Going to maximum is a skill, and the only get good at it is through practice.  You have to challenge and break your PR’s again and again and again.  This is a mental challenge as well as a physical one, and requires both mental and physical toughness.

     

    Snatching 101kg for a new PR is physically similar to snatching 100kg to tie your PR.    But mentally it is a whole different ball game. Breaking into uncharted territory and lifting something you have never lifted before requires a little more commitment.  It requires you to fight and win a battle within your own mind.  Anyone who has ever had problems committing to a snatch knows exactly what I am talking about.  But with practice, you can get better and better at winning this mental battle.

     

    This is one of the reasons why I advocate keeping track of your PR’s from the hip, and from the knee as well as from the floor.  I also keep track of doubles from these positions and other combinations such as 1 snatch from the hip + 1 from the knee or one from the knee + 1 from the floor.

     

    Keeping track of a variety of PR’s and constantly challenging them insures that you are training at maximal intensity, getting enough variety so you don’t get stale, AND constantly practicing the mental skill of breaking into uncharted territory.  As you get physically stronger, you will also be getting mentally stronger!

     

    Any lifter who competes long enough is eventually in the situation of having to make a new PR to win a competition, qualify for a national meet, or to beat a rival.  Who do you think is more likely to make the lift when it matters?  Someone who challenges PR’s in training on a consistent basis, or someone who doesn’t?5961860-orig_orig


     
  • glennpendlay 11:11 pm on September 7, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Breaking PR’s. 

    Going to maximum is a skill, and the only get good at it is through practice.  You have to challenge and break your PR’s again and again and again.  This is a mental challenge as well as a physical one, and requires both mental and physical toughness.

     

    Snatching 101kg for a new PR is physically similar to snatching 100kg to tie your PR.    But mentally it is a whole different ball game. Breaking into uncharted territory and lifting something you have never lifted before requires a little more commitment.  It requires you to fight and win a battle within your own mind.  Anyone who has ever had problems committing to a snatch knows exactly what I am talking about.  But with practice, you can get better and better at winning this mental battle.

     

    This is one of the reasons why I advocate keeping track of your PR’s from the hip, and from the knee as well as from the floor.  I also keep track of doubles from these positions and other combinations such as 1 snatch from the hip + 1 from the knee or one from the knee + 1 from the floor.

     

    Keeping track of a variety of PR’s and constantly challenging them insures that you are training at maximal intensity, getting enough variety so you don’t get stale, AND constantly practicing the mental skill of breaking into uncharted territory.  As you get physically stronger, you will also be getting mentally stronger!

     

    Any lifter who competes long enough is eventually in the situation of having to make a new PR to win a competition, qualify for a national meet, or to beat a rival.  Who do you think is more likely to make the lift when it matters?  Someone who challenges PR’s in training on a consistent basis, or someone who doesn’t?5961860-orig_orig


     
  • glennpendlay 5:00 pm on September 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Justin Brimhall 

    Justin Brimhall is one of those lifters that made coaching fun.  The first time I saw Justin and his brother Zack was at a high school football game.  I watched him walk down the aisle and sit down, and I can’t really tell you what made me think this, but I immediately thought “those guys would make good weightlifters”.   I was sitting with one of my lifters so I sent him over and told him to ask them if they were possibly interested in weightlifting, and if so to ask them to come over and talk to me.  They were, and they did, and I invited them to come to MSU and check it out.  The both showed up, and yes, they both seemed to have natural talent for the sport.  Maybe because their mother was Turkish, and actually lived pretty close to the Turkish training center when she was growing up?  Zack was a pretty good lifter and a great guy, but Justin took to weightlifting like a fish to water.

    The first time I saw him, he had a ton of curly hair.  He was also skinny as a rail.  The combination of the skinny body and this huge mop of hair made me comment at his first practice that he was so skinny we could turn him over and use his head for a mop.  The nickname stuck.  I gave it when he was 14 years old, and even after graduating from college and becoming an officer in the Marine corps I still call him Moppy and so do most of those who lifted with him.

    Moppy is one of those guys who had so many interesting quirks to his personality I could write a book just about him.  I also to this day can’t so much as think about Moppy without a big smile spreading across my face.  He had this one unique ability that he called the “Turkish hop”.  It demonstrates a unique combination of athletic ability, balance, and explosive leg strength that I have never seen demonstrated by another human.  To do the Turkish hop, first do a pistol, or single leg squat.  Then stand from the squat so fast that you are able to JUMP about 5 feet, landing on the other leg then without any hesitation performing another pistol with that leg that ends with another jump.  Moppy could do this for 40 yards or more with absolutely no hesitation whatsoever.  Just leaping from a pistol with one leg to a pistol with the other.  But the real kicker is that he could do this while holding a 25kg plate at arms length overhead.  I have never met another human who could come anywhere near being able to reproduce this feat.

    Moppy did some amazing things in training,  like jerking 170kg for a double as a 16 year old weighing 75kg.  He had trouble in competition though.  He was one of those lifters who would get so nervous that he would often throw up at some point between the weigh in and the warm up.  In part because of this he was never able to do the lifts he was physically capable of when it counted.  But in spite of this, I think I speak for everyone who ever came into contact with Justin Brimhall when I say that I am lucky to have known him.  He is one of those unique people who just  made life more interesting.

     

     

    5961860-orig_orig


     
  • glennpendlay 5:00 pm on September 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Justin Brimhall 

    Justin Brimhall is one of those lifters that made coaching fun.  The first time I saw Justin and his brother Zack was at a high school football game.  I watched him walk down the aisle and sit down, and I can’t really tell you what made me think this, but I immediately thought “those guys would make good weightlifters”.   I was sitting with one of my lifters so I sent him over and told him to ask them if they were possibly interested in weightlifting, and if so to ask them to come over and talk to me.  They were, and they did, and I invited them to come to MSU and check it out.  The both showed up, and yes, they both seemed to have natural talent for the sport.  Maybe because their mother was Turkish, and actually lived pretty close to the Turkish training center when she was growing up?  Zack was a pretty good lifter and a great guy, but Justin took to weightlifting like a fish to water.

    The first time I saw him, he had a ton of curly hair.  He was also skinny as a rail.  The combination of the skinny body and this huge mop of hair made me comment at his first practice that he was so skinny we could turn him over and use his head for a mop.  The nickname stuck.  I gave it when he was 14 years old, and even after graduating from college and becoming an officer in the Marine corps I still call him Moppy and so do most of those who lifted with him.

    Moppy is one of those guys who had so many interesting quirks to his personality I could write a book just about him.  I also to this day can’t so much as think about Moppy without a big smile spreading across my face.  He had this one unique ability that he called the “Turkish hop”.  It demonstrates a unique combination of athletic ability, balance, and explosive leg strength that I have never seen demonstrated by another human.  To do the Turkish hop, first do a pistol, or single leg squat.  Then stand from the squat so fast that you are able to JUMP about 5 feet, landing on the other leg then without any hesitation performing another pistol with that leg that ends with another jump.  Moppy could do this for 40 yards or more with absolutely no hesitation whatsoever.  Just leaping from a pistol with one leg to a pistol with the other.  But the real kicker is that he could do this while holding a 25kg plate at arms length overhead.  I have never met another human who could come anywhere near being able to reproduce this feat.

    Moppy did some amazing things in training,  like jerking 170kg for a double as a 16 year old weighing 75kg.  He had trouble in competition though.  He was one of those lifters who would get so nervous that he would often throw up at some point between the weigh in and the warm up.  In part because of this he was never able to do the lifts he was physically capable of when it counted.  But in spite of this, I think I speak for everyone who ever came into contact with Justin Brimhall when I say that I am lucky to have known him.  He is one of those unique people who just  made life more interesting.

     

     

    5961860-orig_orig


     
  • glennpendlay 1:06 am on September 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags:   

    Mindset 

    I am again closing in on a sub 7 minute 2k.  One thing that I have noticed about rowing is that the effectiveness of a workout is directly related to how miserable you are during.  Any effective workout is going to be absolutely miserable.

    I have tried to lower my 2k time by doing long slow rows, like 10k or longer, and I have tried short intervals even as short as 200 meter sprints.  I found that doing things to decrease the misery factor also decreased the effectiveness of the training.  Really long rows are probably good for something, but they don’t seem to directly affect my 2k time.  To effect that, I have to concentrate on distances closer to 2k, and row at a pace that is also closer to 2k pace.  Which also puts the misery level closer to what I feel during a fast 2k.  A 2500 meter or a 3K row done just slightly over 2k pace might even be worse than a fast 2k.

    Really short intervals like 200 meter sprints, while being fun and often not miserable at all, also don’t seem to help much.  For intervals to really help, I have to make them at least 500 meters, and limit the rest period.  Multiple 500 meter intervals with 1 minute rest period are a pretty useful workout.  But doing 10 sets of this interval again might actually be more miserable than just doing a fast 2k.

    In short, there is simply no way to get around the discomfort of the training process.   In this, rowing is much like weightlifting.  The things that are useful are hard.  Multiple heavy sets of 5 on the back squat.  Heavy deadlifts, heavy pulls, or heavy push presses.  All hard.  All miserable if you push yourself hard enough to actually move the weight up over time. Maxing your snatch is not miserable.  For many who “dabble” in weightlifting it is fun.     Everyone loves to max the snatch.  But that is not weightlifting.  It is not the sport I fell in love with.  The sport I fell in love with is hard.  Brutal even.  And to succeed in it you have to have a certain mindset.  A mindset that develops over time and comes to not only accept the discomfort and sometimes downright misery of the training process, but to welcome it.  To look forward to the misery.  To fall in love with it.5961860-orig_orig

    As a competitor I fell in love with weightlifting, even with all the misery involved.  Now as a rower and I am trying to appreciate the misery in rowing.  But even more important to me is to foster the love of of weightlifting in a new generation of lifters.  Even with all the discomfort of the training process, it is a great sport to love!


     
  • XLAthlete Blog 10:17 pm on September 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Finally a Calculator for Pre-Workout, Intra-Workout and Post Workout Calculations 


    The Athletes Resource Calculator A.R.C. is a Resource/Tool for Coaches and Athletes to figure out how much Protein and Carbs are needed for Each Workout!! This is incredibly important for athletes as many are not taking advantage of nutrition Peri-Workout to maximize stimulus and recovery. The A.R.C. provides numbers based on Sex, Weight, Type of Stimulus, Duration of Stimulus, and Perceived Rate of Exertion.


    https://quantifiednutrition.com/arc/


    I hit them up for Product discount code - qnulaunch17 is  10% off until 30 SEP 2017. All products are Informed Sport Certified, so safe for athletes who are tested.

    From Quantified Nutrition Website:

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    The A.R.C. is meant to be used exclusively with Quantified Nutrition products. Our scoops were designed to measure your Q//WHEY and Q//FUEL products within 1.5G accuracy, so you can easily measure the serving size suggested by the A.R.C.! Get exactly what you need, when you need it, and eliminate the guessing game."

    https://quantifiednutrition.com/arc/


     
  • XLAthlete Blog 10:17 pm on September 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Finally a Calculator for Pre-Workout, Intra-Workout and Post Workout Calculations 


    The Athletes Resource Calculator A.R.C. is a Resource/Tool for Coaches and Athletes to figure out how much Protein and Carbs are needed for Each Workout!! This is incredibly important for athletes as many are not taking advantage of nutrition Peri-Workout to maximize stimulus and recovery. The A.R.C. provides numbers based on Sex, Weight, Type of Stimulus, Duration of Stimulus, and Perceived Rate of Exertion.


    https://quantifiednutrition.com/arc/


    I hit them up for Product discount code - qnulaunch17 is  10% off until 30 SEP 2017. All products are Informed Sport Certified, so safe for athletes who are tested.

    From Quantified Nutrition Website:

    "The Athletes Resource Calculator (A.R.C.) is an ‘industry first’ tool, developed in collaboration with our coaches and nutritionists. Our goal is to provide athletes with a system that suggests how much of their Quantified Nutrition products they should be taking, based upon the type of physical training they are doing and how hard they are working. We are tired of seeing the suggested “take one scoop”, as if that’s a solution for everyone.  As a company, we strive to be better than that!

    The A.R.C. is meant to be used exclusively with Quantified Nutrition products. Our scoops were designed to measure your Q//WHEY and Q//FUEL products within 1.5G accuracy, so you can easily measure the serving size suggested by the A.R.C.! Get exactly what you need, when you need it, and eliminate the guessing game."

    https://quantifiednutrition.com/arc/


     
  • XLAthlete Blog 10:17 pm on September 2, 2017 Permalink | Reply  

    Finally a Calculator for Pre-Workout, Intra-Workout and Post Workout Calculations 


    The Athletes Resource Calculator A.R.C. is a Resource/Tool for Coaches and Athletes to figure out how much Protein and Carbs are needed for Each Workout!! This is incredibly important for athletes as many are not taking advantage of nutrition Peri-Workout to maximize stimulus and recovery. The A.R.C. provides numbers based on Sex, Weight, Type of Stimulus, Duration of Stimulus, and Perceived Rate of Exertion.


    https://quantifiednutrition.com/arc/


    I hit them up for Product discount code - qnulaunch17 is  10% off until 30 SEP 2017. All products are Informed Sport Certified, so safe for athletes who are tested.

    From Quantified Nutrition Website:

    "The Athletes Resource Calculator (A.R.C.) is an ‘industry first’ tool, developed in collaboration with our coaches and nutritionists. Our goal is to provide athletes with a system that suggests how much of their Quantified Nutrition products they should be taking, based upon the type of physical training they are doing and how hard they are working. We are tired of seeing the suggested “take one scoop”, as if that’s a solution for everyone.  As a company, we strive to be better than that!

    The A.R.C. is meant to be used exclusively with Quantified Nutrition products. Our scoops were designed to measure your Q//WHEY and Q//FUEL products within 1.5G accuracy, so you can easily measure the serving size suggested by the A.R.C.! Get exactly what you need, when you need it, and eliminate the guessing game."

    https://quantifiednutrition.com/arc/


     
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