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  • Nikki Shlosser 2:35 pm on July 29, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    The Origins of StrongFirst Programming 

    By Pavel Tsatsouline, Chairman

     

     

    There are many ways to get strong. 

    Most are mediocre, some are effective, a handful are extraordinary. 

    One—if not the only—system in the third category is the Soviet Olympic weightlifting methodology of the 1960s-1980s.  Names of Vlasov, Rigert, Alexeev and many other Soviet champions of that era were written in stone in the history of strength.  Some of their records, e.g. Vardanyan’s and Zakharevich’s, are still untouched 30 years later.

    (Yes, drugs are a part of that story—but let us not kid ourselves that the opponents were clean and that steroids were an exclusive domain of the Soviets.  Everything else being equal—with everyone juicing—the best method still prevails.)

    The Soviet system built strength to last.  Recalls David Rigert: “I am not crazy about Bulgarian seventeen-year-old world champions.  They are gone too quickly.  I am convinced that weightlifting is an occupation for men…  Our weightlifting school is most reliable.  For instance, Vasily Alexeev lost to no one for almost ten years.  And more than that—he kept setting world records until he was 36 years old!”

    “I should not complain either,” continues Rigert who broke 63 world records over a decade.  Several years after he hung up his lifting belt to became a coach, David decided to challenge one of his students, the superheavyweight world record holder of the day, to a clean pull contest.  The much lighter Rigert who had done no lifting apart from coaching demos for four years matched the young gun’s best deadlift…

    David Rigert’s coach Rudolph Plyukfelder won the Olympics at a tender age of 36—a feat never repeated in the sport of weightlifting.  Today eighty-some-year-old Plyukfelder casually does rock bottom jump squats with 200 pounds for reps!

    Strength to last indeed.

    The System did not have a single author; it grew out of corroboration between Medvedev, Vorobyev, Chernyak and other scientists, many former champions themselves.  While all these giants had their own take on details, in principle they agreed on the following:
     

    1.    A high volume of lifts with 70-80% 1RM is the foundation of strength.

    Yuri Vlasov explained: “An increase in the volume of training loads leads to long term [structural and functional] changes in the organism… builds a foundation for increasing strength… Of course, strength grows at the same time, but not too much.  [Then] an increase in intensity assures a quick conquest of new results.  But by itself intensity does not produce deep adaptive responses.”

     

     

    The lion’s share of this foundation volume must come from moderately heavy weights.  Half of the Soviets’ lifts were with 70-80% 1RM.
     

    2.    Training loads must be highly variable.

    In the West the key word in strength planning is “progression”.  In the East it is “variability”.

    You might find it crazy, but the Soviet system did not chase rep PRs.  Where an American powerlifting cycle is carefully laid out to set personal bests—the best set of five, the best triple—a Soviet coach just put the reps under the lifter’s belt in a sophisticated loading pattern that was anything but linear.  Did you know that the popular-in-the-West scheme of three weeks up and one down was used only by low-level Russian athletes?  It was not unusual for the elite to have their tonnage double from one week to the next—only to fall like a rock again in week three and do something equally unexpected in week four.  Although not as sharply, intensity also changed suddenly.

    Prof. Arkady Vorobyev discovered that sharp changes in training loads pack a punch like nothing else.  A classic experiment by a researcher from his team, A. Ermakov, demonstrated that a training plan with load “jumps” was 61% more effective that a plan with traditional smooth waves!
     

    3.    Do 1/3 to 2/3 of the maximal reps you could do fresh with that weight.

    In most cases Soviet weightlifters would do only 1/3-2/3 of his RM, be it in quick lifts or squats and presses.  For example, if 70% is your 10RM, you should keep your reps with this weight in the 3-6 range.  If 80% is your 6RM, 2-4 reps per set are what the doctor ordered.

    Note that the above formula applies only to weights in the 70-90% 1RM range.  Heavier than 90% weights are all lifted for singles.  For weights below 70% the rep count is typically around 1/3 of the maximum possible.
     

    Although the Olympic lifts are not my specialty, I pay attention because the programming principles discovered by Soviet specialists in this field are universal for all strength training.  A case in point, the training system of today’s victorious Russian National Powerlifting Team was designed by Boris Sheyko, formerly a weightlifting coach.  If you are familiar with my work, it will be obvious to you that my most effective programs like “Grease the Groove” and the “Rite of Passage” are also firmly rooted in the above principles discovered by the great minds of Olympic weightlifting.

    Although GTG and ROP have been remarkably successful, for a long time I have been unsatisfied, unable to apply many gems of the Soviet weightlifting science to strength training outside of competitive weightlifting, especially when it came to waviness of the load.  Some of the weightlifting periodization schemes were too sophisticated to disassemble and reassemble to benefit anyone but rare strength nerds.  Many tactics refused to be translated into use with kettlebells due to large jumps in sizes.  But I kept at it, trying to develop algorithms that would enable any reasonably intelligent person without a specialized background to design exceptionally powerful strength training plans—kettlebell, barbell, or bodyweight—fully in compliance with the methodology that won Mother Russia so much gold. 

    I believe I have succeeded.

    Thirteen SFGs with a starting max of a 40kg strict single arm kettlebell military press followed one particular plan.  After eight weeks, 11 out of the 13—85% of the subjects!—were able to press 44kg.  (Two of them put up the Beast but one admitted that his starting max was closer to 44kg than 40kg.)  On a similar plan for the ladies with a 20kg max, a third of the subjects advanced to 24kg and the rest repped out with the 20.  Anyone who tried to push up his or her military press once they have reached the point of diminishing returns will tell you that this is some serious progress.  You are dealing with small muscle groups with high neurological efficiency and, unlike the squatting muscles, they are very reluctant to get stronger.

    Many of the subjects commented how unexpected and seemingly random were the load jumps from day to day and week to week.  Yet they were anything but random.  American program design may be compared to a photograph, and Russian to an impressionist painting.  An experienced eye can easily see the logic behind an American powerlifting plan.  A Russian plan, when you look at it up close, is just noise.  Remember the scene at the museum in Ferris Bueller’s Day Off?  Cameron zones out in front of George Seurat’s spectacular painting.  His eyes unfocus and the image of a little girl washes out into a blur of colorful dots…  You have to step a lot farther back to see the pattern in what appears to be chaos.
     


     

    This November I am teaching a special one and a half-day seminar: PLAN STRONG: How to Design Powerful Kettlebell, Barbell, and Bodyweight Strength Programs
     

    I will deconstruct the most powerful and sophisticated strength training system the world has ever seen.
     

    Then I will show you how to apply it to your kettlebells, barbell, and bodyweight lifts for exceptional strength gains.
     

    Power to you!

     

     
  • Jim Wendler 1:00 pm on July 23, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Henry Rollins 

    Like most people my age, Rollins is synonymous with Black Flag. Black Flag and those (IIII) bars are synonymous with anger, intensity and some serious angular/disjointed riffing. For others, Lollapalooza (I don’t know if I’m spelling that correctly – I’m not Googling that. I have my standards) was their introduction to Rollins Band or maybe [...]
     
  • Nikki Shlosser 5:05 pm on July 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Focus (Kime) and the Hard-Style Swing 

    By Reneta Music, SFG II, SFB, SFL

     

    “You need to keep your abs tight.”
    “Grab the floor with your toes and tighten your legs.”
    “The only part of your body that should be loose are your arms.”
    “Mrs. Music, how did you know his abs weren’t tight??”
    “I don’t get it, how did you see that??”

    This was a conversation that went on last night in karate class. I watched a karate student preform Naihanchi Shodan, practicing for his test as I do with all my students who are eligible to test.

    How could I see the lack of tightness in the abs and know that he wasn’t rooting or having tension in his legs? I practice Shurite Kempo which is a hard style method of self-protection. The principles we practice are the same as strength training. Allow me to explain…

    Before I begin my explanation, I want to define a word that I will use throughout the article. The word is maximal. The definition, according to Merriman-Webster dictionary is “most complete or effective”. In other words, applying just the right amount.

    Practicing Naihanchi Shodan requires full body maximal tension achieved instantly for brief moments of time. Utilizing the concept of Go-ju, the hard complements the soft and the soft amplifies the hard with power and speed. The lower body needs to remain tight and feet rooting, (Naihanchi means to grip the ground), but… The upper body must remain loose to execute proper hard style punches. The abdominal area remains in the maximal tension until the punch is executed then the hips must push forward, slightly relaxing the abs, but only for a brief moment, then to return to maximal tension. The maximal tension that is present in Naihanchi Shodan is comparable to the lockout position of the swing.

     

    “Tighten your abs, grab the floor with your toes, zip up your knees, squeeze your glutes.”
    “Tense your body at the top just like a plank position.”
    This is the top position of a hard style kettlebell swing… or is it the top position of a deadlift, back squat, clean, snatch, jerk, push-press? It is interesting that the beginning of both descriptions are similar. Both, are hard style. Hard style is a method that is practiced to strength train as well as train in karate-do.

    The most important aspect of hard style that I have not mentioned is breathing. Why is that important? The breath in a hard style swing, is executed at the hip snap. The breath in Shurite Kempo, is associated with the punch. It can occur before, during or after the punch, but it is occurs with the maximal tension of the body. Kime, is a moment of focus. Focus in that there is nothing else on the mind, except what is happening at that moment. The apex of a swing or the impact of a punch is a perfect description of kime.

     

     

    The principles and methods that are studied in strength training and in karate-do are parallel to each other. Many times in my karate training, I heard my Sensei repeat to me the words that I read in our manual such as lower your shoulders, grip the ground and move fast with tension and relaxation.

    This is one of my favorite quotes that blends strength training with karate-do:

    “When you train, you should train as if on the battlefield. Make your eyes glare, lower your shoulders and harden your body. If you train with the same intensity and spirit as though you are striking and blocking against an actual opponent, you will naturally develop the same attitude as on a battlefield…” — Ankō Itosu, Okinawan karate master

    Reneta Music began martial arts training in 1991 and achieved her black belt in Japanese Karate in 1994.  She is currently the Chief Instructor for martial arts and kettlebell training at the Mansfield YMCA in Mansfield, OH and the chief karate instructor at the Shelby YMCA, in Shelby Ohio.  Reneta received her level I kettlebell certification in 2011 and level II in 2012.  She also received SFB and SFL in 2013. Reneta is ranked as a 3rd degree black belt in Shurite Kempo and 4th in Japanese karate.

     
  • Jim Wendler 1:00 pm on July 22, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Congrats to Eric Lilliebridge 

    Eric posted a huge total this past weekend – squatting 964.5, bench pressing 534.6 and deadlifting 881. His 2380 total is simply amazing. Congrats to Eric for putting together a very impressive meet.  There are some amazing lifters out there and appreciate them while they are at their peak (or near their peak). Check out [...]
     
  • Jim Wendler 1:00 pm on July 21, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Weighted Chins I like them. I’m not voting for them in the next “Five Awesome Exercises” election but they certainly have their place. I’ve championed chin-ups for years, mostly    because they’re great for the upper back, lats, and arms. And because you can do them anywhere – chin-up bar, top of the  Smith machine, scaffolding, top of the [...]
     
  • Jim Wendler 3:45 pm on July 20, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    New Music (Unless You Take Numerous Selfies) 

    New Music for Untuckers Dear Guy Who Doesn’t Tuck, Thanks for not feeling the need to make endless small talk. Or staring endlessly on your phone. Thanks for being ok with silence. Thanks for not airing your dirty laundry. Or fishing for sympathy or seeking martyrdom. It is nice to know that you realize how [...]
     
  • Jim Wendler 12:17 pm on July 17, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Boring But Strong Challenge 

    Boring But Strong – 13 Cycle Challenge  [NOTE: This is from the Jim Wendler Forum.] How this all came about is a long, long story so I’ll edit it down to the bare minimum: I am currently at the tail end of this challenge and I love it.  This, like the majority of training ideas [...]
     
  • Nikki Shlosser 3:18 pm on July 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    StrongFirst Team Pulls Strong Again 

    By Jason Marshall, Senior SFG and Pavel Tsatsouline, Chairman

     

     
    Ladies and gentlemen, this is Jason Marshall.  We had two lifters for the East Coast meet in Philly, Ellen Stein and Lisa Burke.  Both won their divisions.   Ellen pulled 400 at 132 and won the best overall lifter award.   Lisa deadlifted 345 at 148, a meet PR.
     

     
    We had five lifters for the West Coast meet in Tucson.

    Jeremy Travis competed in Full Power.  He pulled 535 at 194 bodyweight.
     

     

     
    Jeremy Layport competed in his first Full Power comp.  He pulled 573 at 212 bodyweight.  He also won best overall heavyweight male with a 690kg total (551-397-573).   9 for 9 in his first meet!

    Rhonda Jones competed in the Push Pull.  She pulled 298 in the 132lb. weight class.

    Jackie Luciano, SFG II, SFL had a great meet in Full Power.  She pulled a PR 330 at 140 bodyweight.

    I completed in Full Power.  Had a great meet.  Came in second by one hundredth of point by Schwartz formula for best overall lightweight male.  I totaled 627.5kg (463-314-606) at 178 bodyweight, 8 for 9 and all meet PR’s.  My second deadlift attempt was 606 and my right foot slipped causing me to wobble right before lockout and I had to set the bar down.  I wanted to attempt 622 for my third, but stayed conservative and hit 606 solid on the third… a very fast pull.  I also won best lightweight male deadlift.
     

     

     
    Our deadlift team won the 1st place as each of the five had the best deadlift of each weight class.  The meet hosted by SFG Team Leader Danny Sawaya’s Tucson Barbell Club had between 140 and 150 lifters.  A number of other SFGs successfully competed: Erlinda Gomez, Jerry Trubman, Marie Musucara.

    I would like to thank you for the opportunity to lead the StrongFirst Deadlift team the last couple of years.
     

     

     
    Thank you, Jason!  Ladies and gentlemen, this is Pavel.

    A week later Senior SFG Steve Freides set another New Jersey record 100% raw 357-pound pull at 148 pounds of bodyweight and 59 years old.
     

     

     
    I got to celebrate the Father’s Day with my dad pulling another American record—413 in the 198-pound weight class, 75-79 age group, USPA.  Video linked here.

     

     
    I want to thank Jason Marshall, Senior SFG for two years of exceptional leadership as the Captain of the StrongFirst Deadlift Team!

    Jason just passed the captain baton to two new captains: Ellen Stein on the East Coast and Ricardo Garcia, SFG II, SFL on the West Coast.  Welcome!

    The captains have already selected our next two meets.  Mark your calendars: an AAU meet in San Diego, CA, November 7-8 and an RPS meet on Long Island, NY, November 15.

    To qualify for the team ladies must pull 2 times their bodyweight and gentlemen 2.5 times in a powerlifting meet sanctioned by any federation or the October 4 Tactical Strength Challenge.  There is no deadline but applications are taken on the first come, first served basis.  Results posted earlier this year or in 2013 are also accepted.  Send your results and application for review to:

    Ellen Stein, SFL, East Coast Captain, W8lifter222@aol.com

    Ricardo Garcia, SFG II, SFL, West Coast Captain, fullforcepersonaltraining@gmail.com

    We will wrap up with a few words from one of our competitors, Jeremy Layport, Senior SFG:

    “This being my fist powerlifting meet, the one thing that really surprised me was the lack of technical set up by the majority of participants.  There was a definite difference between a SFL cert attendees or SF DL Team members and every other lifter at the meet.  I personally watched a beautiful bench set up from Jackie Luciano and then saw another lifter’s alarmingly poor set up and bench.  Watching SF Deadlift Team Captain Jason Marshall set up for and pull his 603lb. deadlift was like watching a skilled surgeon make an incision.  It was slow, precise, and exacting which he made look easy.  The bend over, grip, and rip strategy didn’t win me over to say the least—and it sure didn’t seem to win the meet either.  If I could give any one person a training tip it would be learn how to “Root,” “Wedge,” and apply skilled tension.  Then just practice more…”

    LIFT THE HEAVY THINGS.
     
    STRONGFIRST BARBELL CERTIFICATION: SFL
     
  • Nikki Shlosser 3:18 pm on July 15, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    StrongFirst Team Pulls Strong Again 

    By Jason Marshall, Senior SFG and Pavel Tsatsouline, Chairman

     

     
    Ladies and gentlemen, this is Jason Marshall.  We had two lifters for the East Coast meet in Philly, Ellen Stein and Lisa Burke.  Both won their divisions.   Ellen pulled 400 at 132 and won the best overall lifter award.   Lisa deadlifted 345 at 148, a meet PR.
     

     
    We had five lifters for the West Coast meet in Tucson.

    Jeremy Travis competed in Full Power.  He pulled 535 at 194 bodyweight.
     

     

     
    Jeremy Layport competed in his first Full Power comp.  He pulled 573 at 212 bodyweight.  He also won best overall heavyweight male with a 690kg total (551-397-573).   9 for 9 in his first meet!

    Rhonda Jones competed in the Push Pull.  She pulled 298 in the 132lb. weight class.

    Jackie Luciano, SFG II, SFL had a great meet in Full Power.  She pulled a PR 330 at 140 bodyweight.

    I completed in Full Power.  Had a great meet.  Came in second by one hundredth of point by Schwartz formula for best overall lightweight male.  I totaled 627.5kg (463-314-606) at 178 bodyweight, 8 for 9 and all meet PR’s.  My second deadlift attempt was 606 and my right foot slipped causing me to wobble right before lockout and I had to set the bar down.  I wanted to attempt 622 for my third, but stayed conservative and hit 606 solid on the third… a very fast pull.  I also won best lightweight male deadlift.
     

     

     
    Our deadlift team won the 1st place as each of the five had the best deadlift of each weight class.  The meet hosted by SFG Team Leader Danny Sawaya’s Tucson Barbell Club had between 140 and 150 lifters.  A number of other SFGs successfully competed: Erlinda Gomez, Jerry Trubman, Marie Musucara.

    I would like to thank you for the opportunity to lead the StrongFirst Deadlift team the last couple of years.
     

     

     
    Thank you, Jason!  Ladies and gentlemen, this is Pavel.

    A week later Senior SFG Steve Freides set another New Jersey record 100% raw 357-pound pull at 148 pounds of bodyweight and 59 years old.
     

     

     
    I got to celebrate the Father’s Day with my dad pulling another American record—413 in the 198-pound weight class, 75-79 age group, USPA.  Video linked here.

     

     
    I want to thank Jason Marshall, Senior SFG for two years of exceptional leadership as the Captain of the StrongFirst Deadlift Team!

    Jason just passed the captain baton to two new captains: Ellen Stein on the East Coast and Ricardo Garcia, SFG II, SFL on the West Coast.  Welcome!

    The captains have already selected our next two meets.  Mark your calendars: an AAU meet in San Diego, CA, November 7-8 and an RPS meet on Long Island, NY, November 15.

    To qualify for the team ladies must pull 2 times their bodyweight and gentlemen 2.5 times in a powerlifting meet sanctioned by any federation or the October 4 Tactical Strength Challenge.  There is no deadline but applications are taken on the first come, first served basis.  Results posted earlier this year or in 2013 are also accepted.  Send your results and application for review to:

    Ellen Stein, SFL, East Coast Captain, W8lifter222@aol.com

    Ricardo Garcia, SFG II, SFL, West Coast Captain, fullforcepersonaltraining@gmail.com

    We will wrap up with a few words from one of our competitors, Jeremy Layport, Senior SFG:

    “This being my fist powerlifting meet, the one thing that really surprised me was the lack of technical set up by the majority of participants.  There was a definite difference between a SFL cert attendees or SF DL Team members and every other lifter at the meet.  I personally watched a beautiful bench set up from Jackie Luciano and then saw another lifter’s alarmingly poor set up and bench.  Watching SF Deadlift Team Captain Jason Marshall set up for and pull his 603lb. deadlift was like watching a skilled surgeon make an incision.  It was slow, precise, and exacting which he made look easy.  The bend over, grip, and rip strategy didn’t win me over to say the least—and it sure didn’t seem to win the meet either.  If I could give any one person a training tip it would be learn how to “Root,” “Wedge,” and apply skilled tension.  Then just practice more…”

    LIFT THE HEAVY THINGS.
     
    STRONGFIRST BARBELL CERTIFICATION: SFL
     
  • Nikki Shlosser 4:45 pm on July 8, 2014 Permalink | Reply  

    Get Stronger: The Chronicles of a Lightweight Beast Tamer, Part II: The Pistol 

    by Kenton Boutwell, SFG II

    Part 2

     
    All I did was try not to think. Instead, I was focused on my breathing. Inhale… Exhale… Repeat.
    I knew my body had the movement memorized, as I had done it countless times before the challenge.

    I wanted to blast that kettlebell through the dome and I knew I had to explode once I reached the bottom position of the pistol. I approached the bell, cleaned it, descended to the bottom, and BOOM… I blasted off. Pistol complete.

    Here are the Strongfirst rules for the pistol (Make sure you know the requirements): The candidate must be barefoot.

    • The candidate may pick up the kettlebell in any manner and hold it in front with two hands by the horns or with one or two hands in the rack on either side.

    • The candidate shall raise one leg in front of him. From that moment on, the foot of the working leg must stay planted.

    • The airborne leg has to stay in front for the duration of the attempt. It does not have to be straight. It may not touch the ground or the working leg.

    • The candidate shall pause motionless long enough to demonstrate balance, then lower himself at least to parallel: “the top surface of the leg at the hip joint lower than the top of the knee.”

    • Neither the kettlebell nor the arms may touch the working leg at any time.

    • A pause in the bottom position is not required. The candidate shall stand up until the knee of the working leg is locked and the hip is extended.

    • The pelvis may not rise faster than the kettlebell.

    • The candidate shall stand on one foot exhibiting control until the head referee’s “Down!” command.

    I want to point out one very important training principle that you must adhere to if you have a goal that you intend to reach. The training principle is referred to as the Principle of Specificity. Put simply, it means that if you want to become better at a skill or exercise then you must perform that skill or exercise. So if you want to be a beast tamer then your training should primarily consist of the pistol, military press and pull-up. All you need is one repetition for each exercise, so your training should consist primarily of single repetitions. Your program should also involve periodization of load, intensity, and volume in order to force an adaptation (i.e. getting stronger).

    The moral of the story is not to get too crazy with your training, keep it basic and simple. These are two of the most important training tips I can give you for any training that you will ever do.

    As you can tell the pistol requires mobility of the ankles, knees, and hips. Other than mobility and strength, balance is probably the most important physical skill required to complete a pistol. I referenced mental imagery in part one. You will want to use your mental imagery before beginning any major lift. Just do a replay of you performing the exercise in your mind.

    I recommend holding the kettlebell with both hands in the goblet position as I think it allows for the most balance since it’s centered and you also have both hands instead of one to hold the bell with. Once you’ve got the the kettlebell in the goblet position, you will want to do a static stomp with the working leg in order to generate tension and balance you out.

    Breathing is critical as I mentioned in part one. You really need to focus on your inhalation and exhalation timing, as well as the tempo. I would always static stomp, lift the non-working leg, and do a short inhalation and exhalation to ensure my balance.

    Next I would do a tempo-based deep inhalation in my descent to the bottom, while simultaneously generating as much hamstring and glute tension as possible all the way down. This generation of tension will keep the movement balanced and controlled. Your inhalation should end once you reach bottom position and everything should be extremely tight because you have generated as much tension as possible similar to a “coiled spring,” as MSFG David WhitIey likes to put it.

    During your descent it is also important to keep the kettlebell tight to you in the goblet position. If the kettlebell gets away from you then it could compromise your pistol by off balancing you, which could also get you disqualified if it touches your leg. What should you be doing with the non-working leg? I recommend keeping the leg straight and toes flexed. You don’t want this leg moving as it could also jeopardize your balance.

    The last part is the ascent, which should be initiated with a tempo-based exhalation, simultaneous heel drive, and firing of the quadriceps. You will want to explode or uncoil the spring by releasing all the tension you have generated in one forceful motion.

    One of the hardest parts of this movement is the transition from the eccentric to the concentric motion. Just make sure that you are tight at the bottom, and that you concentrate, putting all your focus and attention into the change of direction. Oh and be sure to lock out the hips at the top.

    To be continued.

     


     Kenton Boutwell is a 
    StrongFirst Girya Level 2 Kettlebell Instructor, American College of Sports Medicine certified Personal Trainer, USA Weightlifting Sports Performance Coach, CrossFit Level 1 Trainer,  Precision Nutrition Level 1 and Functional Movement Screen certified professional. Boutwell has worked with men, women, and youth of all ages, experience, and fitness levels, from novices to skilled athletes. He earned his bachelors from the University of Southern Mississippi and is currently pursuing a M.S. in Exercise Science at Middle Tennessee State University. A native of Mississippi, he currently resides in Nashville, Tennessee.  For more information please visit www.kbfitness.com
     
     
     
     

     
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