Warning: include(wp-content/themes/twentyfourteen/inc/include-wp.php) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home3/evosite/public_html/wp-config.php on line 77

Warning: include(wp-content/themes/twentyfourteen/inc/include-wp.php) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home3/evosite/public_html/wp-config.php on line 77

Warning: include(wp-content/themes/twentyfourteen/inc/include-wp.php) [function.include]: failed to open stream: No such file or directory in /home3/evosite/public_html/wp-config.php on line 77

Warning: include() [function.include]: Failed opening 'wp-content/themes/twentyfourteen/inc/include-wp.php' for inclusion (include_path='.:/opt/php52/lib/php') in /home3/evosite/public_html/wp-config.php on line 77
uncategorized | Evolutionary Athletics

Tagged: uncategorized Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • glennpendlay 8:40 pm on June 12, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Don’t Stand When You Can Sit 

    The summer weightlifting camp just started today, and my house is already filled with napping weightlifters.  Many people look at naps as a sign of laziness, but for a hard training athlete naps and just generally learning to take it easy is absolutely crucial.  None other than Paul Anderson said that a lifter should never stand when he could sit, never sit when he could lay down, and never lay down when he could sleep.  And Anderson seemed to know what he was talking.  He won Olympic gold and become the strongest squatter in history.

    If you are not willing to rest and recuperate, training hard is a waste of time.  This camp is a great break from the real world of job’s, responsibilities, kids, etc.  It is a week in a make believe world where an athlete can focus on themselves and approach life and each day of training as if they were a professional athlete with nothing to do but train and recuperate.

    I really believe  most lifters really need an experience like a training camp at some point in their career.  Not that you are going to make enough progress in the 1 or 2 weeks of the camp to propel yourself to the top of the rankings.  You won’t.  What you might do is learn how hard you can push yourself and what your real limits are.  and that is far more valuable.5961860-orig_orig


     
  • glennpendlay 3:59 pm on June 11, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Summer Weightlifting Camp 

    5961860-orig_orig

    One of the lifters coming to the camp this week ask me what to expect.  My answer is, the same type of training I have used for years.  When the lifters show up, we are going to jump right in and train heavy.  I use a wide variety of exercises but they are usually variations of the competitive lifts, and we almost always go as heavy as possible.  So snatches from the hip, the knee, and the floor as well as cleans or clean and jerks from those positions.  We will also do complexes consisting of one snatch or clean pull plus one snatch or clean and jerk.  We might add in snatches or cleans with a pause, or snatch or clean pulls with a slow negative.

     

    For most of the lifters this camp will consist of 14 or 15 training sessions consisting of at least 10 different exercises.  If this camp is anything like previous camps there will be multiple PR’s set every single workout.  And one thing that always surprises the athlete, while they will feel like crap by day three or four, they will keep performing and keep making PR’s.

     

    Even at the Christmas camp, which was a full two weeks, athletes were still making new PR lifts right up until the last day.  Whether they felt good or bad, they were often able to perform maximal lifts when asked.  Jon North used to say that this was what he liked about me as a coach, the fact that I did not put limits on him as an athlete.  He was right about that, and the reason I don’t is I don’t know when a lifter will have a huge day and when they will have a terrible day.  I might suspect that they are tired and wont lift well, or I might suspect that they will be strong that day, but I don’t know for sure.  And the only way to tell for sure is to warm up and try it.  So twice a day for the next 7 days we will be trying to make new  PR’s.     Wish you could be here!


     
  • glennpendlay 7:29 pm on June 10, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Still on Track 

    IMG_3651

     

     

    Well it has been a while now since I had a stroke and ended up in the hospital and in a coma.  In the subsequent years I have worked pretty hard to get and stay healthy.  I made some changes that included stopping using snuff, losing weight, and starting to run or row.  Still working on the 6.59 2k which has been my goal since i got the C2, but this BP reading tells me I am on the right track.


     
  • glennpendlay 2:30 pm on June 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Goldilocks 

    These days it seems that everyone is bragging about their workouts on social media.  Folks can’t wait to tell you about the EPIC workout they had last night.  It was, well, EPIC.  They survived unbelievable pain and suffering, and were even able to snap a nice picture of the sweat angel they left on the floor.  The only problem is, one especially hard workout isn’t doesn’t really help you get your squat up.  What does help you get your squat up is a workout that is just a tiny bit harder (or heavier) than the last one.

     

    Easy workouts won’t help, but neither will workouts that are epic in their difficulty.  They need to be in the Goldilocks zone, neither too easy nor too hard.  Difficult enough to cause an adaptation, but not so difficult they can’t be recovered from and adapted to.  They need to be just right.  Workouts that are just right won’t make you a hero on social media but they will make your snatch and your squat go steadily upward.  The best way to stay in this zone is by employing slow progression.  Progression because the workload has to rise over time to give the body a reason to adapt, but slow progression because the human body can only adapt at an extremely slow pace.  Trying to speed things up only overwhelms the body and leads to no adaptation at all.  The only problem is, telling folks that your squat workout last night was medium hard won’t get you a lot of followers on Twitter

     

     


     
  • glennpendlay 2:30 pm on June 9, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Goldilocks 

    These days it seems that everyone is bragging about their workouts on social media.  Folks can’t wait to tell you about the EPIC workout they had last night.  It was, well, EPIC.  They survived unbelievable pain and suffering, and were even able to snap a nice picture of the sweat angel they left on the floor.  The only problem is, one especially hard workout isn’t doesn’t really help you get your squat up.  What does help you get your squat up is a workout that is just a tiny bit harder (or heavier) than the last one.

     

    Easy workouts won’t help, but neither will workouts that are epic in their difficulty.  They need to be in the Goldilocks zone, neither too easy nor too hard.  Difficult enough to cause an adaptation, but not so difficult they can’t be recovered from and adapted to.  They need to be just right.  Workouts that are just right won’t make you a hero on social media but they will make your snatch and your squat go steadily upward.  The best way to stay in this zone is by employing slow progression.  Progression because the workload has to rise over time to give the body a reason to adapt, but slow progression because the human body can only adapt at an extremely slow pace.  Trying to speed things up only overwhelms the body and leads to no adaptation at all.  The only problem is, telling folks that your squat workout last night was medium hard won’t get you a lot of followers on Twitter

     

     


     
  • glennpendlay 2:47 pm on June 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Why teens can’t get huge and jacked 

    teenagers would seem to have every advantage possible when it comes to gaining muscle.  Their schedules are not exactly taxing or strenuous.  Most are in high school or the first year of college, and and let’s be honest, once you are out in the real world for a few years you realize how good ou had it back in high school.  An easy schedule, low stress levels, and a hormone soup running through their veins that any adult would have to pay a lot of money to equal.  Yet they still usually manage to get from age 15 to 18 with no appreciable gains in strength or muscle.

     

    Access to the correct information is not the problem, today’s teens have more access to information on how to get big and strong than ever before.  In fact, they might actually have to much information.  The problem is, they can’t stick with any one plan long enough for it to work.   The high school students of today have grown up in the digital age, and WAITING is not something they do well.  But even in this modern age, humans still analog body they have had for millennia.

     

    Our body is only capable of adapting a little bit at a time.  We adapt to a stimulus that is slightly more stressful than what we have encountered in the past by adapting to a higher level of function.  If the stimulus (the workout) is too stressful, we don’t adapt to a higher level, rather we can barely fight back to baseline.  If the stimulus is too weak, there is also no positive adaptation.  The stimulus has to be JUST RIGHT.  Then it has to be repeated hundreds, maybe thousands of times.  Each workout causes a tiny, tiny little adaptation, and it is only by repeating this process again and again over a long period of time (often years) that an athlete is able to go from a 300 pound squat to a 500 pound squat.

     

    And this is why there are so few teenagers squatting 500 pounds.  They have every possible advantage, except patience.  And as it turns out, patience is absolutely necessary.


     
  • glennpendlay 2:47 pm on June 6, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Why teens can’t get huge and jacked 

    teenagers would seem to have every advantage possible when it comes to gaining muscle.  Their schedules are not exactly taxing or strenuous.  Most are in high school or the first year of college, and and let’s be honest, once you are out in the real world for a few years you realize how good ou had it back in high school.  An easy schedule, low stress levels, and a hormone soup running through their veins that any adult would have to pay a lot of money to equal.  Yet they still usually manage to get from age 15 to 18 with no appreciable gains in strength or muscle.

     

    Access to the correct information is not the problem, today’s teens have more access to information on how to get big and strong than ever before.  In fact, they might actually have to much information.  The problem is, they can’t stick with any one plan long enough for it to work.   The high school students of today have grown up in the digital age, and WAITING is not something they do well.  But even in this modern age, humans still analog body they have had for millennia.

     

    Our body is only capable of adapting a little bit at a time.  We adapt to a stimulus that is slightly more stressful than what we have encountered in the past by adapting to a higher level of function.  If the stimulus (the workout) is too stressful, we don’t adapt to a higher level, rather we can barely fight back to baseline.  If the stimulus is too weak, there is also no positive adaptation.  The stimulus has to be JUST RIGHT.  Then it has to be repeated hundreds, maybe thousands of times.  Each workout causes a tiny, tiny little adaptation, and it is only by repeating this process again and again over a long period of time (often years) that an athlete is able to go from a 300 pound squat to a 500 pound squat.

     

    And this is why there are so few teenagers squatting 500 pounds.  They have every possible advantage, except patience.  And as it turns out, patience is absolutely necessary.


     
  • glennpendlay 11:36 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Instant gratification 

    What is the biggest problem with American weightlifting today?  The pursuit of instant gratification.  This has always been a temptation, but with the advent of the internet (and social media) the temptation has become overpowering.  And unfortunately, the training that leads to the most dramatic short term gains often isn’t what leads to long term progress.

    Case in point:  Almost everyone understands that fatigue from a big squat workout is likely to lower your capability in the clean and jerk for at least a day or two!  And the kind of strength program that leads to bigger numbers in the squat and deadlift and vastly increased potential clean and jerk is likely to leave your weightlifting numbers depressed for a while.

    As a beginner, you should be completely recovered (or close to it) before every workout.  Every workout holds the potential for new records not only in the snatch and clean and jerk, but also in the strength building lifts like the squat, deadlift, and push press.  But as your career progresses it takes more and more training stress to cause an adaptation.  Soon squatting hard enough to make continual progress in the squat means you will not be able to approach each and every workout in a completely recovered and fresh condition.  At some point, the start of a training cycle becomes the time to work on weak points and improving the squat and deadlift, and the end of the training cycle becomes the time to put it all together and use that strength to lift new numbers in the snatch and clean and jerk.

    In fact the more you advance as a lifter the more you have to live with delayed gratification.  Not being able to take the long view is the sign of an immature mind and an immature lifter.  If you know it takes time to build a big total you might be ready for a program that requires more than simply maxing out every day and hoping for the best.  For those of you who enjoy a challenge and have the maturity to stay the course, the X-Files might be right for you.

    https://www.stickthejerk.com/x-files-sign-up-sheet.html

     

     

     


     
  • glennpendlay 11:36 pm on May 20, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Instant gratification 

    What is the biggest problem with American weightlifting today?  The pursuit of instant gratification.  This has always been a temptation, but with the advent of the internet (and social media) the temptation has become overpowering.  And unfortunately, the training that leads to the most dramatic short term gains often isn’t what leads to long term progress.

    Case in point:  Almost everyone understands that fatigue from a big squat workout is likely to lower your capability in the clean and jerk for at least a day or two!  And the kind of strength program that leads to bigger numbers in the squat and deadlift and vastly increased potential clean and jerk is likely to leave your weightlifting numbers depressed for a while.

    As a beginner, you should be completely recovered (or close to it) before every workout.  Every workout holds the potential for new records not only in the snatch and clean and jerk, but also in the strength building lifts like the squat, deadlift, and push press.  But as your career progresses it takes more and more training stress to cause an adaptation.  Soon squatting hard enough to make continual progress in the squat means you will not be able to approach each and every workout in a completely recovered and fresh condition.  At some point, the start of a training cycle becomes the time to work on weak points and improving the squat and deadlift, and the end of the training cycle becomes the time to put it all together and use that strength to lift new numbers in the snatch and clean and jerk.

    In fact the more you advance as a lifter the more you have to live with delayed gratification.  Not being able to take the long view is the sign of an immature mind and an immature lifter.  If you know it takes time to build a big total you might be ready for a program that requires more than simply maxing out every day and hoping for the best.  For those of you who enjoy a challenge and have the maturity to stay the course, the X-Files might be right for you.

    https://www.stickthejerk.com/x-files-sign-up-sheet.html

     

     

     


     
  • Shawn Myszka 7:45 pm on April 26, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: uncategorized   

    Some random thoughts on movement & performance of NFL players 

    Annually, at this time of the year, a couple of things are bound to happen for me during the training of my NFL players:

    -A lot of ideas swirl around my head on the daily. Some of these ideas are good…others pretty bad. Some are theoretical…while some are immediately applicable. Some are logical…and more are pretty far out there. Some are fleeting whereas some others are consistent and continue to hit me like a ton of bricks.

    -I don’t have a ton of extra time to whip together content of any sort. Thus, writing for my blog often becomes an afterthought.

    That all said, I have a rare open hour so I decided to write a different type of blog post today to tick off the boxes above and share some of these thoughts in the process.

    They will read like the post-it notes across my desk(s) do…short, sporadic and random. There may be some themes throughout but for the most part they will likely be all over the place…which shouldn’t come as to much of a shock if you’ve ever had a conversation with me.

    If this blog is well-received, I may consider making it a more frequent occurrence. So, without further adieu, here’s a look into some (trust me you don’t want to hear them all) of the random thoughts circulating around in my head right now.

    -NFL players are just like you and I. I mean, except they recover way quicker and they are capable of operating at way higher outputs. So, these things all equate to meaning; NFL players are actually not like us at all.

    -Which car, both being pushed to its limits, is more dangerous to drive? A Ferrari or a Pinto? The Ferrari of course…b/c its limits are at 200+ mph. You can push an NFL player to the brinks of the edges of their capabilities…as long as they weren’t actually over the edge, they are likely to bounce back really quickly and perform stellar in the meantime. If they DID go over the edge, watch the F out…b/c either they are really depleted and their whole life is going to get negatively affected from this and/or you just set them up for injury (sometimes a really bad one).

    -You can/should screen the little things (how much they are talking, how they are standing, what are they doing during rest periods, etc) in between activities way more than you screen for the behaviors you see occurring during movement or performances. These little things tell you how ready they are but also what types of learning and/or adaptation you can actually get from the next activities that are performed (as well as others performed before this).

    -Slow to smooth, smooth to fast. As Buddy Morris says, “moving slow gets the brain’s attention.” Sometimes to change behavior the quickest way to get the player to coordinate, control, and organize movement more competently is to have them slow down so they can account for changes/nuances at any of the 3 B’s of the movement solution (behaviors, brain, biomechanics). But then the first way to hit the movement save button on a competent behavior is to increase the speed of its execution. Then you should increase repetitions. Then SOON AFTER THIS increase the complexity or variability of the activities prescribed.

    -Both retention and transfer would be increased immensely if coaches would be more apt to go to repetition without repetition models earlier in their progressions. One problem to this; coaches are too interested in appeasing other coaches to actually follow through on repetition without repetition. Solution; stop worrying about what other coaches think of what our athletes look like while they practice. Instead, focus on if, and to what degree, players are actually learning and transferring movement skills from the practice field and training arena to the game field on Sundays.

    -People blame the current NFL CBA for the annual injury incidence rates. I don’t. Spending more time with team coaches (of any sort…position and strength alike) is not going to fix that. Sorry I am not sorry…I have watched what teams do and how they practice…most practices and models are terrible and translate little to increased skilled performance especially under chaos, pressure, fatigue, anxiety, etc. Thus, changes to CBA wouldn’t do crap…instead, change the practice habits and the behaviors that emerge from those practices and I speculate injuries are going to go down b/c skill & preparedness (not physical preparation but skill preparation) will be greater.

    -Why aren’t any teams incorporating a true Performance Therapy model like that which is being driven down in Phoenix, AZ at Altis? Move, observe, treat, move, observe, treat, so on and so forth.

    -I love the influx of NFL sport science. But there’s one problem…many of the NFL’s sport scientists are studying numbers…some are studying players…and fewer are actually studying (to truly understand) the behaviors of those players especially when and where it counts (i.e. in games). I know they can’t put GPS on the players in games so don’t tweet at me or comment on this blog about that…I am talking about being able to explain what it’s happening and why it’s happening that way…when a player has a tactical demand, there is an opponent in front of them, and they most use their sport and movement skills to problem solve. You don’t need data to study that…you need knowledge and wisdom and a detailed eye.

    -Some of the best movers I have seen during closed agility tasks (i.e. change-of-direction tasks) are the worst movers during open agility tasks (i.e. reactive agility tasks). The behaviors (where the attention flows from a perceptual standpoint) and the brain (how intention is driven from the decisions to be made) can and often does change everything!

    -If Strength Coaches analyzed sport movement skills as much as they analyze exercises or program design, their practices would be drastically different and the level of transfer from their training means/methods would be significantly higher.

    -If Position Coaches analyzed sport movement skills as much as they analyze tactical strategies and X & O’s, their practices would be drastically different and the level of transfer from their training means/methods would be significantly higher.

    -Though I am from small town Wisconsin, I hate farms. One thing that is a staple of most farms is the existence of silos. NFL organizations are like farms; one thing that is a staple of most NFL organizations is the existence of silos. Break down the silos…get everyone on the same page…many things will advance…including the players’ performance.

    Okay, that’s probably enough randomness for today!

     


     
c
Compose new post
j
Next post/Next comment
k
Previous post/Previous comment
r
Reply
e
Edit
o
Show/Hide comments
t
Go to top
l
Go to login
h
Show/Hide help
shift + esc
Cancel
%d bloggers like this: